Texting and Driving Laws in Florida

Hochman BlogThe State of Florida Statutes permit police to stop cars and give citations to those that are texting and driving. The law states that a person must not be driving while also manually typing or entering multiple letters, numbers, or symbols into a wireless communication device to send out a text, email, or any other form of message.

These statutes also cover distracted driving. Distracted driving is defined as anything that makes you take your hands off the steering wheel, eyes off of the road, or even distract your mind from driving tentatively, also known as visual, manual, and cognitive driver distractions.

The problem with texting and driving is that it is hazardous because it encompasses all three types of distracted driving. To put it into perspective, a focused driver traveling at a speed of 50 miles per hour will end up traveling a total distance of a football field before coming to a complete stop. If there is cause to put on the breaks up ahead, distracted driving can cause you to react late, often resulting in a crash.

The first offense is a non-moving traffic violation with a base fine of $30, not including court costs, and there are no points assigned to your driver’s license. Since the first violation can set the tone for more, should there be any, getting a Miami traffic attorney to help you dispute wrongful accusations can prevent major repercussions in the future.

The second offense, occurring within five years of the first, is a moving traffic violation with a base fine of $60, resulting in 3 points being added to your license. In work and school zones, texting and driving violations are a moving traffic violation, with a base fine of $60 and three points added to your license.

Any traffic ticket can be stressful for drivers. Hochman and Goldin, P.A. red light camera violation attorney can provide legal counsel throughout the entire process of disputing a ticket. Visit us online to get started or to learn more information.