How Bad Is Texting While Driving in Florida?

textDriveWe all have probably dealt with it at some point: you’re driving on the South Florida roadways only to notice a car going unusually slow, weaving in and out of their lane, or hitting their brakes even though there is clearly no one in front of them. As you’re passing them, you notice the driver is a teenager starting at his or phone instead of concentrating on the road.

Texting while driving is alarmingly common. In fact, a Journal of Adolescent Health study found that close to forty percent of high school students engage in this activity. In Florida’s case, a driver must be at least fifteen years of age to receive their learner’s permit. The study found that Florida has about 37 percent of teens engage in the activity. What’s worse, researchers also found that the chances of teens texting and driving was likely to increase as they got older.

Texting while driving—regardless of age—is considered to be particularly dangerous as it impairs a driver’s ability to visualize while also causing physical and cognitive distractions. In the case of Florida, it is one of the few states in the country that has yet to pass stricter laws regarding cell phone use and texting. For the time being, texting while driving remains a secondary offense in Florida. This means a driver must be pulled over for another reason such as speeding before they can be cited for texting.

To read more about the study, please visit https://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X(18)30250-7/fulltext.

This update is brought to you by Miami traffic ticket lawyer Hochman & Goldin, P.A. We can assist you with criminal traffic violations and we are ready to answer your questions and help you fight your ticket. Please call 305-665-1000 to speak with a Miami expungement attorney.

This information is provided for educational or informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. The information is not provided in the course of an attorney-client relationship and is not intended to substitute for legal advice.

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